Archive for September 13th, 2010

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Hercules: Million Dollar Hunk

September 13, 2010

Image Credit: The Circus ‘NO SPIN ZONE’

Hercules

Identity: One of the four Heroes

Description: Dark, iron-jawed strong-man, usually depicted overpowering a lion or brandishing a club

Symbol: A club

Upright Meanings

Energy. Loyalty. Valour. Ardour. A strong and forceful individual who likes to be in the limelight and to lead others. A go-ahead, fiery, creative personality that does not stagnate.

Reversed Meanings

A quick temper. Pride precipitating a fall. Misdirected energies. An inflated ego. Guilt complexes.

Psychological Comment

The four Hero cards represent people, perhaps the enquirer or someone else answering to the temperament described, who might be imposing a strong influence on the enquirer at the time.  In the personal context, Hercules represents the enquirer’s strength and ability to overcome obstacles and deal with any personality fragmentation that might have resulted from preceding periods of stress and difficulty.

People displaying negative Hercules traits tend to be ‘short fused’ – with themselves, as much as anyone else – and often suffer from mistaken impressions as to how they appear to others. Hercules people will always do their own thing, for better or worse, and if for the latter, they will sustain a nagging guilt until they feel that they have effected recompense to their personal satisfaction. 

~ Words Murry Hope, Olympus: An Experience in Self-Discovery

Image Credit

 Johann Peter Weißmüller; 2 Jun 1904 – 20 Jan 1984 was a Austro-Hungarian-born swimmer and actor, Johnny Weissmuller Weissmuller was one of the world’s best swimmers in the 1920s, winning five Olympic gold medals and one bronze medal. He won fifty-two US National Championships and set sixty-sevenworld records.

After his swimming career, he became the sixth actor to portray Tarzan in films, a role he played in twelve motion pictures. Dozens of other actors have also played Tarzan, but Weissmuller is by far the best known. His character’s distinctive,ululating Tarzan yell is still often used in films.

How can a guy climb trees, say ‘Me Tarzan, You Jane’, and make a million?
~ Johnny Weissmuller

Further Reading: The Twelve Labors of Hercules by Janet Kane

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Artemis: of milk and honeybees

September 13, 2010

The fountain of Diana of Ephesus has water flowing from her numerous breasts, symbolizing fertility and abundance, both of nature and of intellect. This goddess, known as Artemis to the Greeks, originated in Ephesus in present day Turkey, where her sacred temple was once one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Other fountains include the Fountain of the Dragon, the Oval Fountain, and the Avenue of the Hundred Fountains. ~ Julianne Davidow

 

Artemis

Identity: Olympian virgin huntress. Sister of Apollo

Descriptive archetype: Athletic, outdoor maiden archer. Patroness of animals

Symbols: Bow and arrow. Torch. Animals in general, but the cat (or lion), dog, hind and bear, in particular.

Upright Meanings

Chastity. Reliability. Protection, particularly against unwarranted attentions. Caution. Good coordination. Love of animals. Sporting skills. Outdoor life. Devotion to parents and close friends. Selectivity of company.

Reversed Meanings

Insensitivity. Remoteness. Recklessness. Lack of coordination. Implacability. Unwarranted disdain.

Psychological Comment

Artemis people are strongly drawn to nature and the country and are seldom, if ever, really at home in urban environments. They are selective where friendships are concerned and jealously guard those whom they feel to be true and loyal companions. But Hades help the friend who is foolish enough to betray such a trust!

Individuals of this archetype tend to be somewhat ill at east with the human race as a whole. They are not party goers or great socialites, preferring the quiet company of those of like mind to what is popularly considered to be a good time. 

Greek classical scholar, Professor Carl Kerenyi, suggests that Artemis’ original companion was a lion, which tends to support Herodotus’ statement that Artemis was one and the same as the Egyptian cat goddess Bast, or her earlier personal the lioness Tefnut, twin sister of the sky god Shu.

~ Words Murry Hope, Olympus: An Experience in Self-Discovery

  

Two Artemis Image Credit: Lactating Fountains

The Ephesus goddess of fertility, Artemis (sometimes called ‘Diana’) in Tivoli, Italy. Artemis was often pictured as draped with eggs and/or multiple breasts  from her waist to her shoulders. What a positive and empowering way to view the human breast!

 Artemis’ fountain was built in the 1500s by Cardinal Ippolito d’Este, son of Lucretia Borgia. Diana’s Fountain once stood at a central location in the gardens of Villa d’Este. She eventually became viewed as ‘too pagan’ and was relocated to a more hidden spot in the garden.~ Source DrMomma

(left) Monument in the Upper Town; (right) Mosaics

Image Credit

Further Reading: The Biology Behind the Milk of Human Kindness

Roman Homes: The Fountains, the Gardens of Tivoli Villa D’Este